Classifying non-bank currency systems using web data

This paper develops a new classification of non-bank currency systems based on a lexical analysis from French-language web data in order to derive an endogenous typology of monetary projects, based on how these currencies are depicted on the internet. The advantage of this method is that it by-passes problematic issues currently found in the literature to uncover a clear classification of non-bank currency systems from exogenous elements. Our textual corpus consists of 320 web pages, corresponding to 1,210 text pages. We first apply a downward hierarchical clustering method to our data, which enables us to endogenously derive five different classes and make distinctions among non-bank currency system and between these and the standard monetary system. Next, we perform a similarity analysis. Our results show that all non-bank currency systems define themselves in relation to the standard monetary system, with the exception of Local Exchange Trading Systems.

Ariane Tichit*, Clément Mathonnat*, Diego Landivar**

* Clermont University, Auvergne University, CNRS, UMR 6587, CERDI, F-63009 Clermont Fd. Email: ariane.tichit@udamail.f; Clement.MATHONNAT@udamail.fr; ** ESC Clermont, 63000 Clermont-Fd. Email: diego.landivar@france-bs.com.

Keywords

non-bank money, text mining, web data, downward hierarchical clustering, similarity analysis

Article Tichit pdf

To cite this article: Tichit, A., Mathonnat, C.,  and Landivar, D. (2016) ‘Classifying non-bank currency systems using web data’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 20 (Summer) 24-40  <www.ijccr.net>  ISSN  1325-9547. http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2016.002

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The “commodity – money – commodity” Mutual Credit Complementary Currency System. Marxian money to promote community trade and market economy

Samo Kavčič

Šercerjeva ul.26, 4240 Radovljica, Slovenia. E-mail: kavcic917@gmail.com

Abstract

The Mutual Credit Currency System, this most radical form of endogenous money, was evaluated and compared with Marx’s Commodity-Money-Commodity requirement.  A simple simulation of a small community closed loop economy was used to illustrate the functioning of two types of mutual credit currency systems. The first, dubbed MCSG, behaved according to the specifications and recommendations of the mutual credit currency system’s founding fathers, Riegel and Greco. The second, dubbed the Komoko Monetary System, or abbreviated to KMS, was a sub-type of the mutual credit currency system with some additional restrictions and one additional liberty. The main restriction introduced in the KMS was that it almost exclusively supported the exchange of only newly produced goods and services. The liberty introduced is forecast-based credit allocation. It was shown that the MCSG has an inconsistency that could potentially lead to instability. The restrictions applied within the KMS can provide a remedy for this potential flaw, while at the same time rendering the KMS compliant with Marx’s requirement. The monetary control measures applicable in KMS were discussed, which guarantee robustness and stability and make KMS a true complement to the official fractional reserve banking.

Keywords

Mutual credit system  , Commodity – money – commodity, Cash flow forecast, Currency circuit,  Monetary control,  Endogenous money

Article kavcic pdf

To cite this article: International Journal of Community Currency Research 20 (Summer) 41-53. <www.ijccr.net>  ISSN  1325-9547. http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2016.003

Key Indicators of Time Bank Participation: Using Transaction Data for Evaluation

This paper presents some key and advanced statistical indicators of time bank participation.  Unlike printed community currencies, time banks record their exchanges in databases.  Such transaction data enables researchers to evaluate member participation in these networks across time.  Nonetheless, there is very little published scholarship employing time bank transaction data.  Examples from a U.S. time bank are provided.  The suggested indicators are intended to encourage coordinators and scholars to study these networks.  Coordinators who track their systems can intervene as necessary.  Scholars researching individual time banks can use these metrics to facilitate comparisons of multiple cases in order to better assess the efficacy of time banking.

Ed Collom

IJCCR 2012 Collom

To cite this article: Collom, E. (2012) ‘Key Indicators of Time Bank Participation: Using Transaction Data for Evaluation’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 16 (A) 18-29  <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2012.002

2007 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems

The Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems is designed to collect vital statistics on a broad variety of indicators related to the function of all types of complementary currency systems. The reason for collecting this information is to provide an accurate statistical and scientific understanding of different types of systems and identify a set of performance indicators from which to make comparisons. From this foundation of knowledge our intention is to open a communication channel that links complementary currency systems together to allow experience, information and knowledge to be exchanged, which contributes to the improvement and growth of our efforts. The information is presented in a wide variety of ways: according to the region, country and the indicators listed, in table and graph forms, using both bar and pie charts. This level of simplicity and flexibility creates a complexity that is sufficient to allow researchers to drill for information from the international level all the way down to the community level.

Stephen DeMeulenaere Volume 12(2008) B2-19

IJCCR vol 12 (2008) 1 deMeulenaere

To cite this article: DeMeulenaere, S. (2008) ‘2007 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 12 2-19 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2008.002

2006 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems

The Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems is designed to collect vital statistics on a broad variety of indicators related to the function of all types of complementary currency systems. The reason for collecting this information is to provide an accurate statistical and scientific understanding of different types of systems and identify a set of performance indicators from which to make comparisons. From this foundation of knowledge our intention is to open a communication channel that links complementary currency systems together to allow experience, information and knowledge to be exchanged, which contributes to the improvement and growth of our efforts. The information is presented in a wide variety of ways: according to the region, country and the indicators listed, in table and graph forms, using both bar and pie charts. This level of simplicity and flexibility creates a complexity that is sufficient to allow researchers to drill for information from the international level all the way down to the community level.

Stephen DeMeulenaere Volume 11(2007) B23-35

IJCCR vol 11 (2007) 2 DeMeulenaere

To cite this article: DeMeulenaere, S. (2007) ‘2006 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 11 23-35 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2007.003

2005 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems

The Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems is designed to collect vital statistics on a broad variety of indicators related to the function of all types of complementary currency systems. The reason for collecting this information is to provide an accurate statistical and scientific understanding of different types of systems and identify a set of performance indicators from which to make comparisons. From this foundation of knowledge our intention is to open a communication channel that links complementary currency systems together to allow experience, information and knowledge to be exchanged, which contributes to the improvement and growth of our efforts. The information is presented in a wide variety of ways: according to the region, country and the indicators listed, in table and graph forms, using both bar and pie charts. This level of simplicity and flexibility creates a complexity that is sufficient to allow researchers to drill for information from the international level all the way down to the community level.

Stephen DeMeulenaere Volume 10(2006) B8-17

IJCCR vol 10 (2006) 2 DeMeulenaere

To cite this article: DeMeulenaere, S. (2006) ‘2005 Yearly Report of the Worldwide Database of Complementary Currency Systems’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 10 8-17 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2006.003