Time Banking in Social Housing

A social enterprise Spice has pioneered a new method of time banking that works with public services in an innovative way. Spice uses time banking as a ‘means to an end tool’ to promote active citizenship, reduce welfare dependency and ultimately reform public services with co-production. This article briefly examines current time banking practices in the UK to set the scene for a discussion of Spice’s approach when applied in Social Housing. Whilst in its early stages, the approach demonstrates some success in increasing participation and improving both individual and community well-being. This is an exciting new use of community currencies to catalyse public sector reform.

Ruth Naughton-Doe Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D73-76

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 14 Naughton Doe

To cite this article: Naughton-Doe, R. (2011) ‘Time Banking in Social Housing’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 73-76 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.025

Josh Ryan-Collins, Lucie Stephens and Anna Coote (2008) The New Wealth Of Time: How Time Banking Helps People Build Public Services

Katharine Devitt Volume 13(2009) C95-97

IJCCRvol13(2009)pp95-97RevDevitt

To cite this article: Devitt, K. (2009) ‘Josh Ryan-Collins, Lucie Stephens and Anna Coote (2008) The New Wealth Of Time: How Time Banking Helps People Build Public Services’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 13 95-97 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2009.008

Change Takes Time: Exploring Structural and Developmental Issues of Time Banking

This paper draws out key conclusions from a recent research project into a voluntary sector time bank in the Welsh Valleys. The aim of the research was to explore the structure and organisational issues of time banks in relation to the development of co-production. Such an analysis attempts to make clear how time bank development fosters the values of co-production as is claimed by research and literature on time banks. The argument in this paper is that whilst time banks can be set-up for a range of purposes, not always tied to co-production, the practices and ideas embedded in the time bank mechanisms do gradually develop the values of co-production. However this is a slow process and requires a successful, initial time bank pilot project to encourage further support for expanding the practice. For those who advocate the development of co-production this paper provides information of time bank development which can support their efforts to promote the idea within the public sector.

Lee Gregory Volume 13(2009) A19-32

IJCCRvol13(2009)pp19-32Gregory

To cite this article:Gregory, L. (2009) ‘Change Takes Time: Exploring Structural and Developmental Issues of Time Banking’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 13 19-32 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2009.003