2012 Special Issue: Thirty Years of Community and Complementary Currencies

Bringing together 17 new research papers from around the world, this special issue celebrates thirty years of community and complementary currencies, and assesses their impacts, potential and challenges. Edited by Jerome Blanc. View the papers individually, using the menu above, or download the whole issue here. IJCCR 2012 Vol 16 Special Issue Complete

Editorial Thirty Years of Community and Complementary Currencies   Jérôme Blanc D1-4
Historical accounts in the U.S.
Democratizing Money:  Historical Role of the U.S. Federal Government in Currency Creation  Saul Wainwright D5-13
Selling Scrip to America: Ideology, Self-help and the experiments of the Great Depression Sarah Elvins D14-21
Tax Anticipation Scrip as a Form of Local Currency in the USA during the 1930s Loren Gatch D22-35
theoretical issues
Community Currencies as Integrative Communication Media for Evolutionist Institutional Design  Makoto Nishibe D36-48
A comparison in transaction efficiency between dispersive and concentrated money creation  Nozomi Kichiji and Makoto Nishibe D49-57
Does Demurrage matter for Complementary Currencies?  Hugo Godschalk D58-69
Economic activity without official currency in Greece: The  *  hypothesis Irene Sotiropoulou D70-79
shortcomings and achievements
Sustainability of the Argentine Complementary Currency Systems: four governance systems  Georgina M. Gómez D80-89
Moral Money – The action guiding Impact of Complementary Currencies. A Case Study at the Chiemgauer Regional money.  Christian Thiel D91-96
Solidarity economy between a focus on the local and a global view  Krister Volkmann D97-105
Stroud Pound: A Local Currency to Map, Measure and Strengthen the Local Economy  Molly Scott Cato and Marta Suárez D106-115
Local exchange trade systems in Central European post communist countries Jelínek P., Szalay Zs., Konečný A. D116-123
An Empirical Study of the Social Effects of Community Currencies Hiromi Nakazato and Takeshi Hiramoto D124-135
CC Coupon Circulation and Shopkeepers’ Behaviour: A Case Study of the City of Musashino, Tokyo, Japan Ken-ichi Kurita, Yoshihisa Miyazaki and Makoto Nishibe D136-145
A two-marketplace and two-currency system: A view on business-to-business barter exchange  Melina Young D146-155
prospects and projects
Emerging trend of complementary currencies systems as policy instruments for environmental purposes: changes ahead? Hélène Joachain and Frédéric Klopfert D156-168
Trophic currencies: ecosystem modeling and resilient economies Marc Brakken, Preston Austin, Stephanie Rearick and Leander Bindewald D169-175

2011 Special Issue: Complementary Currencies: State of the Art

IJCCR 15 (2011) Special Issue (Section D)

Edited by Noel Longhurst and Gill Seyfang

Comprising 15 papers from researchers and academics at the cutting edge of complementary currency development, this special issue represents a powerful consolidation of the state of the art in this field.

View the papers individually, using the menu above, or download the whole issue here.

IJCCR 2011 Complete Special Issue

Editorial

Yet another moment of truth? David Boyle D 1-3

Theoretical Issues

Classifying ‘CCs’: Community,complementary and local currencies’ Jérôme Blanc D 4-10

On The Money: Getting the message out John Rogers D 11-16

Regional Reviews

Complementary Currencies in Germany: The Regiogeld System  Christian Thiel D 17-21

What Have Complementary Currencies in Japan Really Achieved? Yasuyuki Hirota D 22-26

Alternative Exchange Systems in Contemporary Greece Irene Sotiropoulou D 27-31

Complementary Currencies for Sustainable Local Economies in Central America Erik Brenes D 32-38

Community Currency Progress in Latin America (Banco Palmas) Christophe Place D 39-46

L’Accorderie and Le Jardin D’Échange Universel (JEU) in Quebec Mathieu Lizotte and Gérard Duhaime D 47-51

Currency Innovations

Kékfrank to boost the resilience of locality Zsuzsanna Eszter Szalay D 52-56

The SOL: A Complementary Currency for the Social Economy and Sustainable Development Maries Fare D 57-60

Building Local Resilience: The Emergence of the UK Transition Currencies Josh Ryan-Collins D 61-67

A Report from Vermont (USA): The VBSR Marketplace Amy M. Kirschner D 68-72

Time Banking in Social Housing Ruth Naughton-Doe D 73-76

The Colours of Money: Artmoney as Community Currency Mark Banks D 77-81

Complementary Currency Open Source Software in 2010 Matthew Slater D 82-87

Complementary Currency Open Source Software in 2010

This report briefly covers the field of non-commercial mutual credit software, discussing the issues and challenges the projects collectively faced in meeting the needs of the movement. There is a clear cultural divide between commercial barter software which helps businesses exchange spare capacity within the law, and free open source projects which help neighbours to exchange under the radar of the tax man. There is almost no cross-fertilisation between nonprofit, idealistic, community projects, and the business barter. The aims of both cultures are very different, though their methods are similar.

Matthew Slater Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D82-87

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 16 Slater

To cite this article: Slater, M. (2011) ‘Complementary Currency Open Source Software in 2010’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 82-87 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.027

The Colours of Money: Artmoney as Community Currency

Artmoney is a community currency based on the production and exchange of original art. Critical of the cold and objective nature of conventional transactions, the Danish artist Lars Kraemmer first devised artmoney as a means to a more humanised and expressive type of monetary exchange, intending to bring people together in affective, rather than impersonal, forms of trade. Artmoney provides a means of stimulating trade amongst artists and non-artists outside of the conventional money economy, and has grown steadily to become a global currency traded in over 70 countries. Drawing from ongoing research, this article asks, what is the meaning and value of art-money in a global cultural economy? What alternative does it present and what economic futures (or pasts) does it anticipate? Presenting preliminary findings from interview research with art-money producers, this article outlines some of the motives for becoming involved in this art/currency project, and some of the contradictions and challenges raised in its production and circulation.

Mark Banks Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D77-81

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 15 Banks

To cite this article: Banks, M. (2011) ‘The Colours of Money: Artmoney as Community Currency’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 77-81 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.026

Time Banking in Social Housing

A social enterprise Spice has pioneered a new method of time banking that works with public services in an innovative way. Spice uses time banking as a ‘means to an end tool’ to promote active citizenship, reduce welfare dependency and ultimately reform public services with co-production. This article briefly examines current time banking practices in the UK to set the scene for a discussion of Spice’s approach when applied in Social Housing. Whilst in its early stages, the approach demonstrates some success in increasing participation and improving both individual and community well-being. This is an exciting new use of community currencies to catalyse public sector reform.

Ruth Naughton-Doe Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D73-76

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 14 Naughton Doe

To cite this article: Naughton-Doe, R. (2011) ‘Time Banking in Social Housing’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 73-76 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.025

A Report from Vermont (USA): The VBSR Marketplace

This paper described and evaluates a  peer to peer mutual credit system now in operation in the State of Vermont. It is called the VBSR Marketplace and is an innovative partnership between a statewide membership association, Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility (VBSR) and a currency design and management organization, Vermont Sustainable Exchange (VSE). This project is a significant step forward in the community currency world as it makes participation in a mutual credit system a membership benefit for businesses that belong to an already existing and well-established business association.

Amy Kirschner Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D68-72

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 13 Kirschner

To cite this article: Kirschner, A. (2011) ‘A Report from Vermont (USA): The VBSR Marketplace’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 68-72 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.024

Building Local Resilience: The emergence of the UK Transition Currencies

This paper examines the emergence of a new type of local currency – ‘Transition Currencies’ – in the United Kingdom over the past 4 years.  The Transition Currency ‘model’, shared by the initial four schemes, is explained and the theoretical roots of the schemes reviewed. The paper goes on to examine the success and limitations of the currencies and reflects on potential future developments and how the Transition currencies might upscale and deliver additional social, economic and environmental objectives.

Josh Ryan-Collins Volume 15(2011) Special Issue D61-67

IJCCR 2011 Special Issue 12 Ryan Collins

To cite this article: Ryan-Collins, J. (2011) ‘Building Local Resilience: The emergence of the UK Transition Currencies’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 15 (D) 61-67 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.2011.023