Evaluating LETS as a Means of Tackling Social Exclusion and Cohesion

Colin C Williams, Theresa Aldridge, Roger Lee, Andrew Leyshon, Nigel Thrift and Jane Tooke Volume 2(1998) 4

IJCCR Vol 2 (1998) 4 ESRC

To cite this article: Williams, C.; Aldridge, T.; Lee, R.; Leyshon, A.; Thrift, N.; Tooke, J. (1998) ‘Evaluating LETS as a Means of Tackling Social Exclusion and Cohesion’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 2 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.1998.002

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Green Domination In Norwegian LETSystems: Catalyst For Growth Or Constraint On Development?

Research from New Zealand, Australia and the UK has shown that LETSystems in many instances are dominated by “greens”. This paper presents the results from a survey of four Norwegian LETSystems. The findings show that the situation in these LETSystems is, to a large extent, similar. Members are generally politically radical, and seem to have joined LETS primarily for environmental/ideological reasons. Most have full-time employment, are rather well off in economic terms, and a vast majority have university education. The paper concludes that although such a biased membership profile theoretically hinders full achievement of the aims of LETS, it may be a necessary first step towards more widespread success.

Even Gran Volume 2(1998) 3

IJCCR Vol 2 (1998) 3 Gran

To cite this article: Gran, E. (1998) ‘Green Domination In Norwegian LETSystems: Catalyst For Growth Or Constraint On Development?’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 2 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.1998.003

Local Economic Trading Systems: Potentials for New Communities of Meaning: a brief exploration of eight LETSystems, with a focus on decision making

A LETS can be described as a non-profit community based trading network that operates by way of a locally created currency, i.e. a locally recognised measure of exchange value as distinct from national currency. LETS’ emergence in the 1980’s, and rapid growth throughout English speaking countries in the 1990’s (Williams 1995), arguably stems from experienced scarcity of money in local communities. According to Jackson (1994), it is primarily a product of developed nations ‘where money has assumed dominance as the medium for exchange’. Considered in the context of contemporary economic developments, LETS also invites regard as localised responses to the globalisation of capital. It was with an eye to the latter, that I undertook this exploration of eight LETS groups in Victoria, Australia.



IJCCR Vol 2 (1998) 2 Ingleby

To cite this article: Ingleby, J. (1998) ‘Local Economic Trading Systems: Potentials for New Communities of Meaning: a brief exploration of eight LETSystems, with a focus on decision making’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 2 ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.1998.004

Corporate Barter and Economic Stabilisation

Twenty-two years of data on North American corporate barter reveal strong counter-cyclical tendencies. Corporate barter changes in the same direction as wholesale inventories, but against changes in capacity utilization or gross domestic product. Standard arguments on the inefficiency of barter need to be seriously reevaluated. The findings have implications for trade and monetary policy, both domestically and internationally.

James Stodder Volume 2(1998) 1

IJCCR Vol 2 (1998) 1 Stodder

To cite this article: Stodder, J. (1998) ‘Corporate Barter and Economic Stabilisation’ International Journal of Community Currency Research 2 <www.ijccr.net> ISSN  1325-9547 http://dx.doi.org/10.15133/j.ijccr.1998.005