[Conference] 11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – Call for papers

11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – ISIRC 2019

Please find below the call for papers for ‘11th International Social Innovation Research Conference.’ One of the streams (‘Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations‘) mentions specifically community currencies. This stream draws on the “diverse economies” approach.

Read the full description of the panel Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations.

Paper abstracts 

Paper abstracts must be maximum 300 words, excluding references. They should articulate: the research objectives or questions being addressed; the conceptual or theoretical perspectives informing the work; where appropriate, the methodology utilized; and the contribution of the paper to knowledge in light of the conference themes.

Optional full paper submission for consideration in best paper awards is due no later than 31st July 2019.

A maximum of two abstracts may be submitted per presenter (joint papers to be presented by co-authors will also be considered).

All paper abstracts must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.ukOn abstract submission please ensure you advise the conference stream.

Panel proposals
Panel proposals must be maximum 400 words, excluding references. They should include: the panel purpose and its relationship to the nominated conference stream; details of (minimum) three and (maximum) four papers and paper presenters to be included in the panel; and the expected contribution to the panel.
All panel proposals must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Best Paper Competition 
Paper Submission:
To be eligible for the Best Paper awards you will need to submit a full paper by July 31st.  Papers should be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Article files should be provided in Microsoft Word format in font 12 with double spacing. Articles should be between 6500 and 9500 words in length with a maximum 300 word abstract. This includes all text including references and appendices. You should provide a title page with details of authors. References to other publications must be in Harvard style and carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency.
•          All tables and figures/diagrams should be included in the text
•          Selected full papers will be fast-tracked for publication in Special Editions of: the Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise Journal

​Indicative deadlines
Abstract and panel proposals submission: Closes 28th February 2019
Decision on submissions: Notification by 31st March 2019
Full papers submitted for consideration in best paper awards due: 31st July 2019 

Enquiries about conference administration and technical issues related to online submission should be directed to the conference administration team at isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

More info at the original sources:

http://www.isircconference2019.com/call-for-papers.html

http://www.isircconference2019.com/uploads/1/2/0/0/120062879/alternative_economic_organising_for_social_innovation_ecologies_of_context_and_relations.pdf

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[PhD Offers] Call for Proposals for Up to Three PhD Scholarships – Monetary Orders in Capitalist Modernity

The Hamburg Institute for Social Research is offering up to three scholarships for doctoral projects that seek to analyze empirical phenomena of monetary (dis-)orders with the aim of further developing debates on monetary theory. Proposals should focus on studying empirical phenomena that have not yet been considered by research or be dedicated to re-visiting previously explored issues and empirical evidence with new theoretical equipment. Of course, the ideas themselves can also become the subject of observation, provided that this is done with reference to monetary realities.

This call for proposals responds to developments in economic sociology, the history of capitalist cultures, political economy, and the anthropology of economic practices, in which modern economic forms are increasingly reflected upon as monetarized economies. All in all, these reflections are based on conceptual considerations on the question of what money actually is. For too long, perspectives on economic sociology, economic history, and political economics in particular have been marked by a neglect of theoretical considerations regarding money. Modern economies were commonly examined as market exchange economies, a theoretical framework that presupposes money as a functional condition, but is not specifically focused on modern economies as monetarized economies. Although empirically ubiquitous, in the research on processes of marketization and practices of market exchange, money itself has occupied a theoretically subordinate position. By placing empirical observations of money and its theoretical reflection at the center of capitalism research, however, it becomes possible to further develop alternatives to increasingly questionable, well-established conceptualizations of modern economies.

The scholarships will be awarded for innovative project ideas that deal with empirical cases to critically engage in these theoretical debates and seek to articulate independent positions. Proposals do not necessarily have to be premised on a preliminary decision as to whether money is to be addressed as a medium of exchange, as an “absolute” social means (of exchange), as credit—that is, a creditor-debtor relationship—, as a diverse collection of culturally shaped monetary practices, or in another, very different way. What is important is that the proposed research projects seek to make theoretical decisions on the basis of careful deliberation and scrupulous assessments that constitute significant and competitive contributions in the context of current debates. Under no circumstances should the following list of possible topics therefore be considered complete:

  • How and why do alternative means of payment (such as local or crypto currencies) arise and how do multiple currencies and monetary orders coexist, what interactions or interferences arise between them, and what social effects do these contacts have?
  • What role do monetary orders play in macroscopic developments of global inequalities?
  • Are changes or structural continuities of monetary orders related to other socio-economic transformation processes such as digitalization?
  • How has the functional, economic, or social significance of cash changed; how can we assess the current debate on the opportunities and risks of abolishing cash from a sociological and political-economic perspective? What is the relevance of cash as a field of business and as a growing global market for research on and theories of money?
  • What significance do monetary hierarchies between currencies and between forms of money have for global power relations; how do these relations change as a result of transformations in the global economy and the economic rise of states and regions?
  • What significance do monetary hierarchies and the shift of the privilege of money creation to private banks have for the economic dynamics and stability of financialized capitalism?
  • What role do nation-states play for the creation and maintenance of monetary orders—in theory and in practice? How “monetarily sovereign” are modern states, that is, do they have the capacity to finance every expenditure, independent of their revenue?
  • To what extent can reflection on the nature of money contribute to our understanding of the construction, development, and crisis of Europe’s supranational currency?
  • Do financial and economic crises have dimensions relevant to a theory of money?
  • What role does the value or purchasing power of money play for different theories, and what explanatory approaches do we have and need in order to record changes in monetary values and relations? Is there a need for a new, non-economic theory of inflation and if so, what would it be like?
  • Do we need a theory-sensitive analysis of the history of ideas of money and monetary orders, because the existing ones are shaped by certain theories of money that may be questionable from today’s perspective?
  • Which social conflicts that are linked to the design of monetary orders can be identified from a contemporary and historical perspective? To what extent is making such distinctions useful for furthering the analysis of economic change; that is, how sensitive must the history of capitalism be with regard to the significance of money?

The Hamburg Institute for Social Research has a tradition of focusing on the phenomenon of violence. Research projects that can bridge the gap between theoretical debates on violence and analyses of monetary (dis)orders are thus especially welcome.

The scholarships carry a monthly stipend of 1400 Euro. This is a base amount. Scholarship recipients will receive supplements for one or more children and may be eligible for further supplements. Detailed information can be found here. The scholarships will be awarded for two years with an option for an extension of up to two further years.

Scholarship-financed research projects at the Hamburg Institute for Social Research come with an additional budget for travel, books, and other research-related expenses that are appropriate to the requirements of the respective project. A workplace will be provided, and regular presence at the Institute is expected for the duration of the scholarship.

Applicants must have an above-average degree in sociology, history, cultural studies, political science, economics, or a related discipline.

Applications with cover letter, curriculum vitae, an academic work sample (master thesis, term paper), certificates and transcripts showing grades for all courses completed, and an outline of the proposed doctoral project or a collection of sketches of ideas (five pages maximum) must be submitted in a single PDF document by e-mail to monetary-orders(at)his-online.de. The closing date for applications is 18 November 2018. The earliest date for funding is 1 March 2019.

If you have any questions regarding the content of this call, please do not hesitate to contact us at the e-mail address provided.

Source: https://www.his-online.de/en/the-institute/working-at-his/vacant-positions/phdscholarships/

[Workshop] Community Currency Systems for Solidarity Economy

When: from Friday September 14 to Sunday September 16.

Where: Giovinazzo, Bari (BA), Italy.

Participation fee: 100€ (food and accommodation included).

Language: Italian. 

 Different kinds of “other currencies”, social or community, local and complementary, are attracting increasing attention also in Italy. However, the role that this social innovation may have in fostering solidarity and sustainable economy remains largely underestimated. 

Italian RES (i.e. Solidarity Economy Network), RetiCS research group (i.e. Community Currencies Network), Solidarius Italia and Decrescita Association organize a Workshop in Giovinazzo (Bari, BA), dedicated to the adoption Community Currency Systems into the Solidarity Economy Network.

The school is opened to social activists, scholars and practitioners. The arrival of participants is expected for Thursday evening 13 September and It will finish on Sunday morning 16 September at 1 pm.

The participation fee is 100 € (70 € for unemployers and students). It will cover the costs of food and accommodation in a shared dormitory for all three days of school.

The accommodation will be provided by Casa per Ferie Fra ‘Camillo Campanella (Seminario Fratelli Cappuccini) distant 1 km from the downtown of Giovinazzo and the railway station. 

At the beginning of September there are still available about ten beds. For those who do not want to sleep in the shared dormitory you can find accommodation at around 30 euros per night in B&B located in Giovinazzo.

For info and registration send an email request to laboratorioomonete@gmail.comor call (+39) 348 0438238.

For more information: http://www.retics.org/2018/07/22/scuola-laboratorio-monete-altre-strumenti-di-scambio-e-credito-mutuale-per-le-comunita-e-le-economie-solidali-giovinazzo-di-bari-1416-settembre-2018/

[International Conference] Monetary Innovation and Complementary Currencies Researcher Symposium

BLOCKCHAINS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: Monetary Innovation and Complementary Currencies Researcher Symposium

Date: Thursday 25.10.2018.

Time: 10h00 – 13h00 (10:00 am to 01:00 pm).

Venue: Room S4, Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.

Co-host: UNRISD, RAMICS, IFLAS, B4SD.net, SCC.

Researcher Symposium on Monetary Innovation and Complementary Currencies at the United Nations on Thursday 25.10.2018.

We welcome post-doctoral, doctoral, and master researchers who work on the topic of monetary innovation, monetary decentralization, in a digital currency or physical currency format, using a blockchain or cryptographically-secured currency or not, with a focus on the broader implications of these innovations for a sustainable society, whether from a legal, sociological, developmental, political, anthropological, management or economics perspective.

Background

Blockchains for Sustainable Development is an event that will be held at the UN World Investment Forum at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on October 24th. This forum will be exploring the practical and regulatory implications of blockchain and cryptocurrency technologies. As the co-organizers of this session, Prof. Dr. Jem Bendell and Stephen DeMeulenaere have been active for many years on the subject of complementary currencies and the design of money for cooperation and sustainability, they have initiated this Researcher Symposium to encourage further research in this field. This Researcher Symposium, organised and facilitated by doctoral fellow Mag. Christophe Place, hopes to gather the contributions of as many postgraduate level students as possible.

Every participant will present their research. The format will be 5 minutes presentation (researcher profile, research question, methodology, findings, contribution), 5 minutes questions and answers. UNRISD researchers will attend and provide feedback on the presentations.

To request participation as a presenter, fill-in the form on https://goo.gl/forms/GxMVbVo8OhxaWwiv1 by Tuesday 25.09.2018 with the following information: Forename, SURNAME, Institutional Affiliation, Research Title, Research Abstract (max. 200 words), Email, Phone (facultative). By confirming your participation, you agree on sharing this information and your presentation with all participants if selected as a suitable candidate to present.

Register for the World Investment Forum on http://www.b4sd.net/.

Organized by the Institute for Leadership and Sustainability (IFLAS) at the University of Cumbria. IFLAS thanks Blockchain Charity Foundation and the Made In Africa Initiative for supporting our work. Thanks also to Pundi X for assistance provided.

[CALL FOR PAPERS] Rethinking Money, Rebuilding Communities: A Multidimensional Analysis of Crypto and Complementary Currencies

CALL FOR PAPER, PACO 13(1): 2020

PARTECIPAZIONE E CONFLITTO,  issue 1, 2020

Call for paper for the Special issue on:

“Rethinking Money, Rebuilding Communities. A Multidimensional Analysis of Crypto and Complementary Currencies”.

Guest Editors:

Marco Fama, Università della Calabria, Università di Bergamo

Ricardo Orzi, Universidad Nacional de Luján, Argentina

Stefano Lucarelli, Università di Bergamo, CNRS Paris

Call for Papers:

The overall goal of this special issue is to stimulate the debate on the experiences of monetary innovation emerged after the 2007 financial crisis, exploring in depth their multiple social, economic and political dimensions.

In particular, the special issue aims to provide a theoretical interpretation and an empirical survey of Crypto Currencies and Complementary Currencies, understood as innovative social technologies that have the potential of charging social and economic relations of new meanings, enabling the pursuit of a set of collectively defined goals which the exclusive circulation of official money could not achieve.

We assume that, in the current context of economic and environmental crises, social innovations in the monetary field could play a fundamental role in building connections among communities and in triggering virtuous mechanisms of wealth creation and distribution that better respond to local needs. However, ongoing experiments are still too marginal and its concrete effects largely uninvestigated.

Complementary Currencies are generally portrayed as tools able to enhance the resilience of local communities, strengthening exchanges, trust and cooperation among its users. However, there still is little empirical evidence on its socio-economic impact, also due to the persistence of unsolved methodological controversies. In any case, evaluation models should not be limited to the identification of quantitative variables and indicators, but attempt to bring to light the multiple social and political implications of the phenomenon.

Crypto Currencies are a different, and in many aspects more controversial, phenomenon. However, its underlying technologies have opened new interesting possibilities that are now being explored also in more socially-oriented experiences which call for attention.

In both cases, focusing on the strictly intertwined social, economic and symbolic dimensions of the ongoing experiments is fundamental to gain insight and to provide helpful recommendations for practitioners and policy makers.

 

This special issues aims to nourish the academic and public debate on monetary innovations with rigorous analysis based on an interdisciplinary approach, integrating sociological, political and economic perspectives. It welcomes papers that investigate the socio-economic impact of Crypto Currencies and Complementary Currencies, exploring their limits and potentialities, as well as the underlying participation processes, possible conflicts and contradictions.

Articles, employing different theoretical, empirical and methodological approaches, should explore one or more of the following thematic areas:

  • analysis on the nexus between money and social behaviour, focusing on whether and how this relationship is redefined in alternative monetary circuits;
  • epistemological and methodological reflections on evaluation procedures of Complementary and Crypto Currencies;
  • case study analysis with a particular focus on participation processes, subjectivities involved and the political and symbolic dimensions;
  • evaluation of experiences of monetary innovation and their impact on trust, social capital and local development;
  • identification of best practices and analysis of the possible role of institutions in supporting experiences of monetary innovations.

Timeline:

Articles, written in English, should be submitted to the editors according to the following schedule:

–  Submission of long abstracts (about 1,000 words): 15th of April 2019

–  Selection of long abstracts: 10th of May 2019

–  Submission of full articles: 27th of August 2019

–  Provision of peer review feedback: 15th of October 2019 June 2019

–  Submission of revised drafts: 30th of January 2020

–  Publication of the issue: 15th of March 2020

Articles should be no longer than 10,000 words, including notes and references. A maximum of 10 articles will be published.

Please refer to the editorial guidelines available at:

http://siba-ese.unisalento.it/index.php/paco/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Please address any queries to the Editors – Proposals and papers have to be sent to the guest editors:

marco.fama@unibg.it

ricardoorzi@gmail.com

stefano.lucarelli@unibg.it

For more information, please visit the original source: http://siba-ese.unisalento.it/index.php/paco/announcement/view/86 

[Short Course] The Synergia Programme: Transition To Co-operative Commonwealth

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John Restakis, Molly Scott Cato, Michel Bauwens, Rob Hopkins, Cilla Ross, Tim Crabtree, Pat Conaty

An intensive two-week study programme with Schumacher College and the Synergia Institute

What is the ethical economy and how does it work?

The course will provide a critical overview of the contours of this new political economy and the mechanisms required for its realization through radical systems change.

The program focuses on introducing and integrating a range of social innovation models for harnessing sustainability transitions in applied contexts, including co-operative business models, social finance & democratic capital, commons and co-op solutions for housing, local & sustainable food systems, renewable energy, user-controlled social care, the commons, open knowledge systems, and many other topics.

A key purpose of the program is to provide a global context for these issues and to link models, practices, expertise, and action horizontally across these fields. The program has a strong emphasis on translating theory and scholarship into applied contexts and is delivered by experts with a strong emphasis on the importance of applied scholarship in the context of sustainability transitions.

The creation of new networks, relationships, and action alliances among change makers and program participants is also a primary objective of this program. The course also combines lectures and workshops with site visits to leading co-operatives and commons activities in the region.

Participants will gain an 
• Understanding of the basic history, theory and practice of economic democracy as the foundation for transition to a new form of political economy.
• Understanding of what a political economy for people & planet means and how it functions.
• Overview of best practices and models of system change in key sectors (food, land & shelter, labour, energy, social care, knowledge).
• Understanding of how the perspectives and best practices of key movements relate to each other and comprise a holistic approach to system change.
• Opportunity to share experiences & ideas with other practitioners and to forge new relationships & alliances.
• Understanding of how to apply the theory & practice of progressive system change to one’s personal work and context.

Complementary and Community Currencies will be covered in the two sessions on social finance and democratic capital, to be delivered by Pat Conaty.

Participants will create linkages both to participants and facilitators who have been part of earlier course offerings – both in-person and online.

The Synergia Programme will include

The Problematic with John Restakis
How might we frame the historic moment in which we find ourselves from a political economy perspective? This session presents both a historic retrospective on the movement for economic democracy and how the current configuration of global capitalism demands new perspectives, models, and action strategies for change makers world-wide.

The Partner State with John Restakis
The current crisis of the welfare state is the culmination of a process of de legitimation that has been in the making for more than a generation. For many, the very notion of the state as a force for the good is untenable. But is there a way to reclaim and re conceptualize the state as an institution in service to the common good? This session introduces the concept of the Partner State as an extension of the principles that characterize co-operative economic democracy as a political, economic, and social ideal.

Labour and the Precariat with Cilla Ross
With the emergence of revolutionary digital and informatics technologies, traditional forms of labour are rapidly being replaced with the rise of a new class of precarious and atomised work that threatens not only the livelihoods millions but also the very meaning of work itself. This session examines the implications of this revolutionary shift in the forms of labour, what this entails for the well-being of workers, local communities, and society, and how co-operative and human-centred models of work can challenge the dominant paradigm.

The Commons with Michel Bauwens
Over the last decade, the idea of the commons has emerged as a powerful antidote to the prevailing private property and free market notion of how economies, markets, and social relations might be organized. In particular, the rise of digital platforms and the restructuring of online work through the operation of peer-to-peer networks has offered a revolutionary re think of how co-operative and commons-based principles are redefining both economic and societal relations in service to the common good. This session examines what the idea of the commons means for re visioning models of political economy as alternatives to the status quo.

How to apply

If you would like to book onto one of our short courses, you will need to create an account. This is a simple process of choosing a username, email address and password. Once you have created an account you will receive a verification email. Please click on the verification link within to have full access to the site and to make your booking. (You may need to  check your spam folder if you do not see this email.)  We will email you confirmation of your payment and any further communication about your course application.

A place can not be guaranteed unless we receive your deposit or payment on your chosen course. If you would like to apply for a bursary, please do this before making your course application.

*For more information, please visit the original website*

 

[ MOOC ] – The first Community Currency Design Course is online

We are honored to announce that the first Community Currency Design Course is now available for free on the Grassroots Economics website. The quality of the course is surely granted by the extraordinary experience and knowledge of Dr. William O. Ruddick and his staff behind the Grassroots Economics organization. The course is divided into 5 modules, each one dedicated to a specific topic. Mainly addressed to practitioners, the goal is to understand how to set up and design a community currency project. [ 1 ]

Click here to start the MOOC

Background

On May 2010, Dr. William O. Ruddick introduced Eco-Pesa to three informal settlements inside Kongowea Location in Mombasa County, namely: Kisimu Ndogo, Shauri Yako, and Mnazi Mmoja. Later he founded Grassroots Economics Foundation and in 2013 developed the Bangla-Pesa model based on the results of Eco-Pesa, in the informal settlement of Bangladesh, Kenya.

A 50 Bangla-Pesa note

Other currencies in Kenya that follow the Bangla-Pesa model include Gatina-Pesa in Kawangware, Kangemi-Pesa in Kangemi, Lindi-Pesa in Kibera, Ng’ombeni-Pesa in Mikindani. K’Mali in Kokstad South Africa, as well as Berg-Rand or BRAND in Bergrivier South Africa, also follow a similar model. [ 2 ]

All local currencies that emerged after the Eco-Pesa in Kenya (six in 2017) experience are now grouped under the label Sarafu-Credit, but they originally were issued under the supervision of an association named Koru Kenya, which does no longer exist. In 2017, six communities are currently using Sarafu-Credit in Kenya totaling over 1200 users. The system is the same in all of them, though each community uses its own version of Sarafu-Credit, giving it a unique name depending on the local toponyms, and managing it independently. [ 3 ]

About the author

Dr. William O. Ruddick is a development economist focusing on East Africa. After completing graduate school researching high energy physics as a collaboration member at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, he found his analysis skills and passion drawn to alternative economics and development. Since 2008 Will has lived in East Africa and managed several successful development programs in environment, food security and economic development. He is dedicated to connecting communities to their own abundance, and is an advocate for, and designer of, Complementary Currencies for poverty eradication and sustainable development. Dr. William O. Ruddick has pioneered Community Currency Programs in Kenya since 2010 and is the founder of the award-winning Bangla-Pesa program. He consults on Community Currencies worldwide and while researching with the University of Cape Town’s Environmental Economics Policy Research Unit. Dr. William O. Ruddick is also an associate scholar with the University of Cumbria’s Institute for Leadership and Sustainability. [ 4 ]

Sources

[ 1 ] https://www.grassrootseconomics.org/mooc

[ 2 ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eco-Pesa

[ 3 ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarafu-Credit

[ 4 ] Dr. William O. Ruddick Linkedin Profile