[ MOOC ] – The first Community Currency Design Course is online

We are honored to announce that the first Community Currency Design Course is now available for free on the Grassroots Economics website. The quality of the course is surely granted by the extraordinary experience and knowledge of Dr. William O. Ruddick and his staff behind the Grassroots Economics organization. The course is divided into 5 modules, each one dedicated to a specific topic. Mainly addressed to practitioners, the goal is to understand how to set up and design a community currency project. [ 1 ]

Click here to start the MOOC

Background

On May 2010, Dr. William O. Ruddick introduced Eco-Pesa to three informal settlements inside Kongowea Location in Mombasa County, namely: Kisimu Ndogo, Shauri Yako, and Mnazi Mmoja. Later he founded Grassroots Economics Foundation and in 2013 developed the Bangla-Pesa model based on the results of Eco-Pesa, in the informal settlement of Bangladesh, Kenya.

A 50 Bangla-Pesa note

Other currencies in Kenya that follow the Bangla-Pesa model include Gatina-Pesa in Kawangware, Kangemi-Pesa in Kangemi, Lindi-Pesa in Kibera, Ng’ombeni-Pesa in Mikindani. K’Mali in Kokstad South Africa, as well as Berg-Rand or BRAND in Bergrivier South Africa, also follow a similar model. [ 2 ]

All local currencies that emerged after the Eco-Pesa in Kenya (six in 2017) experience are now grouped under the label Sarafu-Credit, but they originally were issued under the supervision of an association named Koru Kenya, which does no longer exist. In 2017, six communities are currently using Sarafu-Credit in Kenya totaling over 1200 users. The system is the same in all of them, though each community uses its own version of Sarafu-Credit, giving it a unique name depending on the local toponyms, and managing it independently. [ 3 ]

About the author

Dr. William O. Ruddick is a development economist focusing on East Africa. After completing graduate school researching high energy physics as a collaboration member at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, he found his analysis skills and passion drawn to alternative economics and development. Since 2008 Will has lived in East Africa and managed several successful development programs in environment, food security and economic development. He is dedicated to connecting communities to their own abundance, and is an advocate for, and designer of, Complementary Currencies for poverty eradication and sustainable development. Dr. William O. Ruddick has pioneered Community Currency Programs in Kenya since 2010 and is the founder of the award-winning Bangla-Pesa program. He consults on Community Currencies worldwide and while researching with the University of Cape Town’s Environmental Economics Policy Research Unit. Dr. William O. Ruddick is also an associate scholar with the University of Cumbria’s Institute for Leadership and Sustainability. [ 4 ]

Sources

[ 1 ] https://www.grassrootseconomics.org/mooc

[ 2 ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eco-Pesa

[ 3 ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarafu-Credit

[ 4 ] Dr. William O. Ruddick Linkedin Profile

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[Call for an International Roundtable] Cooperation for Open-Source ICT development for Solidarity Economy and Community Currency Systems

Call for an International Roundtable: Cooperation for Open-Source ICT development for Solidarity Economy and Community Currency Systems.

The more Solidarity Economy is growing the more is the need of ICT tools to support it. Platforms to manage a new economy, new monetary and financial structures, which reflect a new way of living are urgently necessary. In the last decades, several tools have been developed, but the fast evolution of technology requires an increasingly expensive cost of maintenance and start-up. A new wave of technologies, such as Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain, will increasingly change the digital world and its impact on reality. We think this will be a big opportunity to enhance the resilience and the self-reliance of communities, starting from considering the following Social Innovations which are able to re-shape the world into a fairer place:

First Roundtable. Local Food and Small-scale Retail Channel Networks.

– Co-production,

– Community Supported Agriculture,

– Cooperative Agriculture and Farmer Networks,

– Small-scale Retail Channel,

– Local Marketplaces,

– Platform for Purchasing Groups,

– Community Privacy Data Protection.

Second Roundtable. Social and Community Currency Systems.

– Crowdfunding Campaigns and Community Investments (e.g. reward-based, equity-based, donation-based),

– Mutual Credit and Time-banking Systems,

– Reward-based Currency Scheme for Social Projects.

The Festival

The Roundtable is hosted by FESTA DELL’ALTRA VELOCITÀ, for more information please click here.

When: from 29/06/2018 to 1/07/2018

Where: c/o ASD Avigliana Calcio, Via Oronte Nota 3, 10051 Avigliana (TO)

An entire event dedicated to the growing sector of Solidarity Economy: presentations of projects, conferences, debates, and roundtables. We wait for you at Avigliana, in Val di Susa, from 29 June to 1 July 2018!

> REGISTRATION <

All the developers are invited to introduce himself or herself and present his or her projects during the first session of each roundtable.  Send your application at teodoro.criscione(at)dr.com by the 3rd of June 2018. For any question do not hesitate to contact us at the same mail address.

Funded PhD on Local Currencies

Fully funded full time PhD on local currencies in stunning Cumbria, supervised Prof. Jem Bendell. Closing date: midnight 18 February 2018.

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The Lake District Pound (LD£) initiative is the context within which the research project will be carried out. This is an innovation in local currency that builds on the prior work and positive outcomes of other complimentary currency initiatives in the UK and globally. The LD£ will operate alongside sovereign Sterling currency with a more direct purpose to support the local rural economy.

This initiative will utilise a range of innovative methods to adapt and extend the idea of a ‘currency with a purpose’ to a rural context with a unique demographic including for the first time a National Park. A core aim of the initiative is to shift visitor spending from using large external businesses (e.g. online retailers and travel companies, remote delivery services, etc.) towards local companies and communities. The anticipated impact is to retain more wealth in the region to fund social and environmental projects and through the local focus and supply chains deliver measureable environmental benefits.
The LD£ initiative has a number of short and long-term aims, which will be greatly enabled through this research project. The aim of the research project is to provide a foundation and framework for measuring the success of the local currency initiative and from that measure, to identify optimum practice and future direction to improve such local currency initiatives.

The PhD research topic is the development of a framework for evaluation of the impact of the Lake District Pound and generation of data on that impact. This evaluation must include indicators of economic impacts, as well as social, cultural and environmental impacts. The evaluation needs to involve quantitative metrics, but can also include more qualitative assessments. It is a multidisciplinary study, with the candidate being able to draw upon a range of fields in consultation with the supervisor (for instance, potential insights from sociology, accounting, corporate sustainability, voluntary sector and organisation studies).

The PhD researcher will work with The Lakes Currency Project Ltd as well as conducting the research for the PhD – and will be based in the stunning Lake District National Park.

The Lakes Currency Project Ltd is the organisation behind the introduction and support of the ‘Lake District Pound’. It is incorporated as a private entity following the guidelines of a Community Interest Company to drive the LD£ initiative as a commercially sustainable project. The generation of revenue from the initiative will be directed in joint partnership with the Lake District Foundation to support vital sustainability projects in and around the National Park, and the Cumbria Community Foundation to support critical projects to help the poorer local communities. Their long-term aim is to develop an element of autonomy and economic resilience within the Lake District and surrounding communities in response to the continually increasing impact of global tourism that often serves to impoverish rural areas.

Benefits

Full-time PhD – annual tax-free stipend of £15,000 p.a. for 3 years
Tuition fees paid for by the industry sponsor (Home/EU fee)

The PhD is supported by the ERDF funded Eco-innovation Cumbria project led by the University of Cumbria.

Application process

To apply please visit the website for details of the entry requirements which must be met and to access the application form. Under the Research Proposal section of the form please summarise your approach to the proposed project outlined in this advert under the following headings: General Overview of Area, Identification of the Relevant Literature, Key Research Questions, Methodology, Timescale/Research Planning

Please include a covering letter telling us why you want to study for a PhD, what interests you about this project and highlight the skills and experience you will bring. Give the title of your research proposal as: “The Lake District Pound: Developing Local Sustainability through Economic Innovation in a Rural Context

For any queries relating to admissions please contact Research Student Admissions rsa@cumbria.ac.uk

If you wish to find out more about the project in the first instance please contact: Ken Royall, Chief Executive, The Lakes Currency Project Ltd. ken@lakedistrictpound.com or Dr David Murphy, Institute for Leadership and Sustainability, University of Cumbria david.murphy@cumbria.ac.uk

Closing date: midnight 18 February 2018.

Interviews to be conducted 26th February 2018 in Ambleside, Cumbria. Candidates will be required to give a short presentation on their approach to the research proposal. Strong candidates may be given the option for an interview by video conference.

Source: Prof. Jem Bendell’s Website

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COMMISSION ON LEGAL PLURALISM Next international Legal Pluralism Conference, 9-11 August 2017 (Syracuse, NY, USA)

The next International Conference of the Commission on Legal Pluralism will take place in Syracuse (New York, USA) on August 9-11, 2017. The conference is organised in collaboration with the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University. The conference theme is: Citizenship, Legal Pluralism and Governance in the Age of Globalization. Please have a look here for an overview of accepted panels. The call for papers can be found here. You can submit your paper proposal until January 31, 2017. Prior to the conference, from 4-7 August, a course will be organized for young scholars on the main theories, themes and methodologies of legal pluralism. More information on the course can be found here. To get an impression of the previous conference and course, you can already have a look at the information provided below.

In particular, readers of our journal could be interested in the following Panel:

The Role of Law in the Ideal Model of the Sustainable Eco-village or City

Panel Coordinator: James S. Krueger ( jskrueger2(at)wisc.edu )

Much has been written about the design elements of a sustainable eco-village or city. It is often assumed that the current model of positivist state law will suffice for the purposes of planning and achieving sustainability and community. This panel examines alternative models of law that might better facilitate the ideal eco-village or city. Such models might be derived from legal pluralism case studies, or from indigenous law and land tenure, or from new versions of property rights like Community Land Trusts, or from some other source. The panel invites both utopian and practical thinking – about the challenge of community in an era of globalization and urbanization, about multiple citizenship identities and conflicting duties of citizenship(s), and about overlapping land and resource rights.

WINIR Conference on Institutions & Open Societies – from 14th to 17th of September, Utrecht University (Utrecht, Netherlands)

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Download the call for papers

Democracies and open societies have recently suffered a number of setbacks. As the adverse impacts of financial crises, inequalities in wealth and income, globalized trade and capital mobility have become more pronounced the world is increasingly threatened by authoritarian populism. In this context of turmoil, many of the accepted doctrines and policies that had previously been taken for granted have been challenged, and concerns have been raised regarding the possible futures of economically and politically open societies“.

Organised in close collaboration with Utrecht University‘s “Institutions for Open Societies” research programme, the Fourth WINIR Conference is set against this backdrop. The conference especially welcomes contributions from any academic discipline that address the challenges and dynamics of the economic, political, legal and social institutions of our time. Submissions on any other aspect of institutional research are also welcome.

The conference will open on the afternoon of Thursday 14 September and end on the evening of Saturday 16 September 2017. There will be an optional tour of historic Utrecht on the morning of Sunday 17 September.
Keynotes lectures, representing three academic discriplines, will be given by:

Johanna Mair (Hertie School of Governance, management)
James Robinson (University of Chicago, politics)
Juliet Schor (Boston College, sociology)

The conference will also feature a round table on “ICT, Open Societies and New Institutions” with José van Dijck (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, media studies), Haroon Sheikh (Dasym Investment Strategies, philosophy) and Fredrik Söderqvist (Unionen, economics), and will be preceded by a PhD workshop.

Abstract submissions (300 words max.) from any discipline and theoretical approach are welcome. All submission must be about institutions, organisations and/or institutional thought.

Submissions will be evaluated by the WINIR Scientific Quality CommitteeBas van Bavel (Utrecht University, history), Simon Deakin (University of Cambridge, law), Geoff Hodgson (University of Hertfordshire, economics), Uskali Mäki (University of Helsinki, philosophy), Katharina Pistor (Columbia University, law), Sven Steinmo (European University Institute, politics), Wolfgang Streeck (Max Planck Institute Cologne, sociology), Linda Weiss (University of Sydney, politics).

Please note the following important dates:

13 March 2017
Abstract submission deadline

30 March 2017
Notification of acceptance

31 March 2017
Registration opens

15 May 2017
Early registration deadline

31 July 2017
Registration deadline for accepted authors

1 August 2017
Non-registered authors removed from programme

15 August 2017
Registration deadline for non-presenters

16 August 2017
Late surcharge for non-presenters applies

1 September 2017
Full paper submission deadline

Organising subcommittee:
Bas van Bavel (b.j.p.vanbavel@uu.nl)Koen Frenken (k.frenken@uu.nl), Francesca Gagliardi (f.gagliardi@herts.ac.uk),
David Gindis (d.gindis@herts.ac.uk), Geoff Hodgson (g.m.hodgson@herts.ac.uk), Rutger Claassen (r.j.g.claassen@uu.nl), Erik Stam ( e.stam@uu.nl).

The WINIR Conference on Institutions and Open societies is organised in collaboration with

For the original article please click here.

 

UNRISD at Resilience 2017 – from 21st to 23rd of August (Stockholm, Sweden)

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If you are researching policies that support resilience and social-ecological transformations to sustainability, UNRISD would like to hear from you. We are organizing a session on “The Transformation we want: Towards a global policy environment for resilient futures” at the Resilience 2017 conference, taking place in Stockholm, Sweden on 21-23 August 2017 and are seeking abstracts on policy reforms and innovations which will produce environmentally sustainable and socially just solutions.

About the UNRISD session

The session is part of the theme on social-ecological transformations for sustainability. Starting from the definition of transformative change proposed in the UNRISD 2016 Flagship Report the session aims to advance the understanding of the political processes underlying eco-social policy approaches that integrate environmentally sustainable and socially just solutions. It seeks to inform global policy debates with an analysis of the processes of change required to promote sustainability and resilience.

What we are looking for

For the UNRISD session, we are looking for national or subnational level examples of policy reform that combine and prioritize social and environmental goals for more sustainable and transformative outcomes. In these examples, we are particularly interested in the politics and power relations that shape transformative change. Abstracts are invited for papers that will address the following questions:

  • How does the new or adjusted policy prioritize environmental and social objectives in an integrated “eco-social” framework?
  • What are the inclusive and democratic characteristics of the reform process?
  • What new institutions, coordination mechanisms or partnerships have emerged from the new/adjusted policy?
  • How is the policy design based on human rights and part of a comprehensive and integrated strategy?
  • What fundamentally different outcomes (transformative change) are driven by the new/reformed policy ?
  • How is the new/reformed policy financed?

Submissions are welcome from scholars, practitioners and policy makers. Priority will be given to developing country examples.

How to submit an abstract

In order to submit your 300-word abstract, please visit http://resilience2017.org/, create an account and select the following options:

Track S – Accepted Sessions

Topic: S55 The Transformation we want: Towards a global policy environment for resilient futures

Conference theme: Social-ecological transformations for sustainability
UNRISD will select up to five abstracts for the session. Other submissions may be considered for inclusion in an upcoming UNRISD Think Piece series on eco-social policies for resilient futures.

Deadline for submission is 13 January 2017. Please contact us at krause@unrisd.org, indicating “Resilience 2017” in the subject line, if you have questions regarding the abstract submission. Please do not send submissions directly to UNRISD; use the conference website as indicated above.

Cost and funding

Accepted speakers will be responsible for covering their own travel and accommodation costs. Limited funding for developing country scholars may be made available by the conference organizers.

About the Resilience 2017 conference

Following previous Resilience conferences held on triennial basis since 2008, Resilience 2017 will discuss resilience as a key lens for biosphere-based sustainability science. It will reflect back on the scientific progress made, and aim to set out exciting future directions for research. A main focus will be on global sustainability challenges and opportunities, which today are heavily influenced by the speed, scale and connectivity of the Anthropocene.

For the original article please click here.

For the web page of the conference please click here.

IJCCR Special Issue – 3rd International Conference on Social and Complementary Currencies (Bahia, 2015)

Dear authors,

we are now preparing a special issue of the International Journal of  Community Currency Research (IJCCR) with papers from the 3rd International Conference on Social and Complementary Currencies that took place Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

We are inviting all authors to submit their papers directly in the IJCCR submission system, following the rules and format of this journal. The papers must to be submitted by December 15, 2016. Papers have to be submitted in English. We suggest the authors make improvements in their papers before submitting to the journal. If accepted, authors will do the proof-reading of their papers. Papers  will follow the normal process of the IJCCR and the accepted papers will compose the special issue.

Our apologies for the delay in communicating the special issue. We look forward to receiving your papers.

Special Issue Editor – Ariádne Scalfoni Rigo (Federal University of Bahia, Brazil)

Chief editor – Georgina M. Gómez (International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam)

 

Ariádne Scalfoni Rigo

Management School of Federal University of Bahia

Avenida Reitor Miguel Calmon

Vale do Canela, EAUFBA, sala 29A
Salvador-BA/Brasil