[Winter School] EUMOL 2019: Leveraging Digitisation in Europe – Call for Papers

Call for Papers

2019 EUMOL Winter School

Leveraging Digitisation in Europe: Law, Money, and Communities Sustainable Development

Fintech and sustainability are the keywords of 2019 EUMOL Winter School: Fintech is a broad area of law and business, going from crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending to instant payments, open banking and virtual currencies (VCs), in addition to big data, cloud computing or smart contracts; sustainability “is informed by recognition of the importance of protecting human rights and securing the fulfilment of fundamental social needs, acknowledging the economic and societal risks that pervasive inequality, globally and within countries, poses” (Beate Sjåfjell and Christopher M. Bruner (eds), Cambridge Handbook of Corporate Law, Corporate Governance and Sustainability. Cambridge University Press, 2019).

Within EUMOL Jean Monnet Chair, we’ll investigate how the «payment landscape in the EU is undergoing significant transformation due to the introduction of PSD2 and the ongoing Fintech developments» (EBA, The impact of Fintech on payment institutions’ and e-money institutions’ business models, July 2019).

There is no straight normative approach: can Fintech be conducive to more sustainable development? Focusing on money as a means of community belonging according to an interdisciplinary approach, are welcome proposals, such as essays, case law analysis, (recently published) book presentations, community projects on virtual currencies as complementary virtual currencies and business projects on Fintech-based products and services, with a view to establishing a close cooperation with the Business and Law Department of the University of Siena.

This call is addressed to scholars and professionals, grassroots, businesses or start-uppers, in any field, seeking to engage seriously with one of the following topics:

  • Fintech: normative approach, competition regulatory challenges, data protection, contract for the provision of payment services, ADR mechanism, Financial inclusion, Sustainable finance, Insurance and Fintech, Blockchain.
  • Virtual currencies: Legal theories of money, Libra case, Family, small firms and over-indebtedness, “Democratization” of payment and financial systems, Economic growth, The challenges to central banking tasks.

The event is held in English, in Siena (Business and Law Department, University of Siena), from 10th to 13th December 2019. Submission procedure: please, send your abstract of between 400 and 800 words by 5th November together with a short C.V. (or a link to the author’s personal webpage) to the JM Chairholder, Gabriella Gimigliano, Ph.D., Business and Law Department, University of Siena: gabriella.gimigliano@unisi.it.

The selected authors will be informed by 10th November. No full paper will be required for the workshop. The project can cover accommodation expenses. Limited funds for covering travel expenses. The workshop presentations may be considered for an edited book proposal (with an international publisher).

[Conference] Complementary currencies and societal challenges – Call for Papers

Call for Papers

International conference on complementary currencies

Complementary currencies and societal challenges:

Crossing academic and practitioners knowledge/perspectives

Time: 21-22 November, 2019 

Venue: Brussels, Belgium

Institutional organizers of the research seminar: the Centre for European Research in Microfinance (CERMi) and the Research Association on Monetary Innovation and Community and Complementary Currency Systems (RAMICS)

The surge of growth of cryptocurrencies and digital money have recently caught the attention of both management scholars and practitioners (Brière et al., 2015; Dodgson et al., 2015; Iansiti & Lakhani, 2017; Lehr & Lamb, 2018; Michelman, 2017; Posnett, 2015; Vergne & Swain, 2017). However, cryptocurrencies are only one of the latest forms of complementary currencies (Blanc, 2016). Before the emergence of cryptocurrencies, complementary currencies were mainly conceived of and issued by citizens, nonprofits, businesses, and even local public administrations, and circulated within a defined geographical region or community (Cohen, 2017; Dissaux & Fare, 2017; Guéorguieva-Bringuier & Ottaviani, 2018; Lietaer, 2001). Also known as local, social, regional and alternative currencies, these complementary currency systems are often developed to respond to societal needs and aspirations that official currencies do not address (Meyer & Hudon, 2017; Fraňková et al., 2017; North, 2007). Specifically, they can be designed to promote sustainable behavior, build community social capital, and foster trade and local development (Blanc & Fare, 2013; Collom, 2007; Gomez & Helmsing, 2008; Marshall & O’Neill, 2018; Seyfang & Longhurst, 2013). For example, inter-enterprise currencies are mainly used in business-to-business networks in order to facilitate the exchange of goods and services between small and medium-sized enterprises (Meyer & Hudon, Forthcoming; Stodder, 2009).

Complementary currencies are socio-economic innovations aiming to address societal challenges of social cohesion, economic inclusion and environmental preservation (Stodder, 2009; Joachain & Klopfert, 2014; Michel & Hudon, 2015, Sanz, 2016). This conference aims to gather researchers and practitioners to explore and debate the potential of complementary currencies for sustainable development and socio-economic resilience (Ulanowicz et al., 2009; Gregory, 2014; Graugaard, 2012). We believe that the topic is one that is predestined for cross-disciplinary research and for thinking beyond established boundaries. We invite conceptual and empirical submissions drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives and diverse methodologies to explore complementary currencies, including researchers working on cryptocurrencies.

The Complementary Currencies and Societal Challenges conference will be held in Brussels, Belgium. The event is designed to include academic and practitioner knowledge and will be organized in two days:

  • November 21 (evening) – Closing event of (E)change Bruxelles project co-organized with Financité

This social event closes the (E)change Bruxelles action-research project co-organized between the Universite libre de Bruxelles and Financite. It celebrates the emergence of the new Brussels local currency ‘La Zinne’. Researchers participating to the research seminar of the 22nd November are welcome to join this social event, although it is not compulsory.

  • November 22: A research seminar (in English) on the following 5 themes:
    • CC and urban resilience
    • CC and civil society
    • Technology and CC
    • CC and entrepreneurship
    • Ethics and CC

Authors who wish to present their papers at the research seminar should submit electronically a three-page abstract by 01 September 2019 to the following mail address cermi@ulb.ac.be (with mhudon@ulb.ac.be in Cc), specifying to which of the 5 themes they wish to bring their contribution. Abstracts will be selected and authors will be notified and invited by 15 September 2019. A full paper will be due on 01 November 2019.

For questions, please contact Marek Hudon (mhudon@ulb.ac.be) and Tristan Dissaux (tristan.dissaux@ulb.ac.be).

We are looking forward to welcoming you on this Complementary Currencies and Societal Challenges event!

Scientific committee

Jérôme Blanc (Science-Po Lyon; Université Lumière-Lyon 2)

Tristan Dissaux (ULB) – Local Organizer

Marie Fare (Université Lumière-Lyon 2)

Georgina Gomez (Erasmus University)

Marek Hudon (ULB) – Local Organizer

Hélène Joachain (ULB) – Local Organizer

Marc Labie (UMONS)

Camille Meyer (Universiy of Victoria)

Ariane Szafarz (ULB)

References

Blanc, J., Fare, M. 2013. Understanding the role of governments and administrations in the implementation of community and complementary currencies. Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, 84(1), 63-81.

Blanc, J. 2016. Unpacking monetary complementarity and competition: a conceptual framework. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 41(1), 239-257.

Brière, M., Oosterlinck, K., Szafarz, A. 2015. Virtual currency, tangible return: Portfolio diversification with Bitcoin. Journal of Asset Management, 16(6), 365-373.

Collom, E. 2007. The motivations, engagement, satisfaction, outcomes and demographics of time bank participants: Survey findings from a U.S. system. International Journal of Community Currency Research, 11, 36-83

Dissaux, T, Fare, M. 2017. A collective redefinition of money: The case of the local currency “La Gonette” in Lyon, France. 29th annual SASE conference, Lyon.

Fraňková, E., Fousek, J., Kala, L., Labohý, J. 2014. Transaction network analysis for studying Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS): Research potentials and limitations. Ecological Economics, 107, 266-275.

Gómez, G.M., Dini, P., 2016. Making sense of a crank case: monetary diversity in Argentina (1999–2003). Cambridge Journal of Economics 40, 1421–1437.

Graugaard, J. D. 2012. A tool for building community resilience? A case study of the Lewes Pound. Local Environment, 17(2), 243-260.

Gregory, L. 2014. Resilience or resistance? Time banking in the age of austerity. Journal of Contemporary European Studies, 22(2), 171-183.

Guéorguieva-Bringuier, L., Ottaviani, F. 2018. Opposition and isomorphism with the neoliberal logic in community exchange systems. Ecological Economics, 149, 88-97.

Gomez, G.M, Helmsing, A.H.J. 2008. Selective spatial closure and local economic development: What do we learn from the argentine local currency systems? World Development, 36(11), 2489-2511

Joachain, H., Klopfert, F. 2014. Smarter than metering? Coupling smart meters and complementary currencies to reinforce the motivation of households for energy savings. Ecological Economics 105, 89-96.

Meyer, C., Hudon, M. (forthcoming). Money and the commons: An investigation of complementary currencies and their ethical implications. Journal of Business Ethics.

Meyer, C., Hudon, M. 2017. Alternative organizations in finance: Commoning in complementary currencies. Organization, 24(5), 629-647.

Michel, A., Hudon, M. 2015. Community currencies and sustainable development: A systematic review. Ecological Economics, 116, pp. 160–171.

Marshall, A. P., O’Neill, D. W. 2018. The Bristol Pound: A tool for localisation?. Ecological Economics, 146, 273-281.

Sanz, E. O. 2016. Community currency (CCs) in Spain: An empirical study of their social effects. Ecological Economics, 121, 20-27.

Stodder, J. 2009. Complementary credit networks and macro-economic stability: Switzerland’s Wirtschaftsring. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 72, 79–95.

Ulanowicz, R. E., Goerner, S. J., Lietaer, B., Gomez, R. 2009. Quantifying sustainability: Resilience, efficiency and the return of information theory. Ecological complexity, 6(1), 27-36.

[5th RAMICS Congress – Call for Papers] Deadline Postponed to the 14th of May

Here is a reminder on the call for papers for the 5th RAMICS Congress, to be held in Japan, Sept. 11-15th.

The deadline has been postponed to May, 14th.

Proposals dealing with community and complementary currencies, under digital forms or not, and with monetary innovation, are welcome.

Don’t hesitate to visit the website of the congress and of RAMICS association.

[RAMICS] Best Paper Award – Japan 2019

The Research Association on Monetary Innovation and Community and Complementary Currency Systems (RAMICS), in partnership with the International Journal of Community Currency Research (IJCCR) and the Bibliography Databank of Community Currency Research (CC-literature), announces the launch of the first edition of the RAMICS’ Best Paper Award on monetary innovation and complementary currency systems.

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This initiative aims to promote research that improves the present understanding of the state, the development and the potentialities of monetary innovation, complementary currency systems and any case of money-based social exchange systems as well. It takes place in the framework of RAMICS biennial congresses. In addition, it seeks to facilitate and strengthen the relationships between those who act in the field of complementary currency research and the movements of activists on the subject, articulating research and practice, rigorous academic reflection and promotion of social change.

Consequently, RAMICS’ Fifth International Congress on Monetary Innovation and Complementary Currency Systems, to be held in Japan – Hida-Takayama, on Sept. 11-15th, 2019, will introduce the first edition of this Best Paper Award, for a paper written in English, considering criteria of originality, relevance, and academic quality.

 Selection process

The selection will take place considering the papers accepted by the international scientific committee of the Congress, and presented during the Congress.

The winner of the award will be announced during the Congress in attendance of the author or at least one author if the paper is co-authored.

The jury may renounce to grant the award if it considers that the competing papers do not meet the expected quality and relevance requirements.

Contest rules

Research norms of an academic paper

Please remember that an academic paper is not a social commentary, an opinion or a “blog”. An academic paper begins with a thesis – the writer of the academic paper aims to persuade readers of an idea or solution to a problem, based on empirical qualitative or quantitative evidence or on theoretical and conceptual analysis. A paper should be structured on a research question that is presented and explained in the introductory section, with reference to the existing literature.

Academic writing should present the reader with an informed argument. The research process is not simply collecting data, evidence, or “facts,” then copy-and-pasting” this preexisting information into a paper. Instead, the research process is about the investigation — asking questions and developing answers through serious critical thinking and thoughtful reflection.

Conditions to be part of the contest

– Articles should be original unpublished material, and not submitted for publication elsewhere.

– Essays will be accepted written English

– Provisional versions or works that have obtained a local, national or international prize will not be accepted.

– The articles must be submitted to RAMICS Congress for presentation, then accepted and presented.

– The applying papers must follow the presentation guidelines that will be circulated in the call for papers of the Congress.

Topics of the papers

– The articles should be based on the thematic areas proposed in the call for papers and guidelines of the RAMICS 5th Congress.

– The work may consist of an analysis of cases and/or theoretical reflections related to the suggested topics.

– Presentations of an individual or collective authorship with no more than three authors will be accepted. In the case of collective essays, the award will be the only one per work.

 The award

The awarded paper will receive an amount of 300 euros. The amount is not per author but per paper, and in the case of multiple authorship, the authors should share this amount.

The awarded paper will be published in the issue of the International Journal of Community Currency Research (IJCCR) that corresponds with the proceedings of the Congress. It will be indexed consequently in the Bibliography of Community Currency Research (CC-literature).

The winners are committed to delivering the final essays adapted to the editorial standards of RAMICS/IJCCR.

 

[5th RAMICS Congress – Call for Papers] Deadline Postponed to the 30th of April

Dear colleagues,

Here is a reminder on the call for papers for the 5th RAMICS Congress, to be held in Japan, Sept. 11-15th.

The deadline has been postponed to April, 30th.

Proposals dealing with community and complementary currencies, under digital forms or not, and with monetary innovation, are welcome.

Don’t hesitate to visit the website of the congress and of RAMICS association.

Regards,

Jérôme Blanc

President of RAMICS


5th Biennial RAMICS International Congress in Japan

Going Digital? New Possibilities of Digital-Community Currency Systems”

11th-15th September 2019, Hida-Takayama, Japan

Important Dates

Submitting abstracts by March 31st, 2019 April 30th, 2019 (Japan Standard Time) *The deadline extended.

Notification of acceptance by April 30th, 2019 May 31st, 2019 (Japan Standard Time)

Submitting full papers by July 12th, 2019 (Japan Standard Time)

*Abstracts and full papers must be submitted through the online submission system, EasyChair (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ramics2019hidatakaya). You have to make an EasyChair account and log in.

Registration

{ Users from China – Registration }

Call for Papers

Contact

RAMICS 2019 Hida-Takayama Organizing Committee

ramics2019takayama@googlegroups.com

Senshu University Digital-Community Currency Consortium Laboratory

(Laboratory 1410, Building 1, 2-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8580, Japan.)

Organizing Committee

  • Pr. Makoto Nishibe (General Chair)
  • Pr. Masayuki Yoshida (Co-General Chair)
  • Masahiko Yamazaki (Co-General Chair)
  • Shigeto Kobayashi (Secretary-General)
  • Kazushige Yamakoshi
  • Ken-ichi Kurita
  • Masaaki Ikeda
  • Yoshihisa Miyazaki
  • Ikuma Fujiwara
  • Pr. Masaaki Yoshida
  • Pr. Takashi Hashimoto
  • Hidetoshi Sawa
  • Pr. Masahiro Mikami

Location

The Takayama Cultural Hall in Takayama.

1-188-1 Showa-machi, Takayama, Gifu, 506-0053 Japan

Main transportation network (Shinkansen, expressway, airport location) from Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya to Takayama

 

[Conference] 11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – Call for papers

11th International Social Innovation Research Conference – ISIRC 2019

Please find below the call for papers for ‘11th International Social Innovation Research Conference.’ One of the streams (‘Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations‘) mentions specifically community currencies. This stream draws on the “diverse economies” approach.

Read the full description of the panel Alternative economic organising for social innovation: Ecologies of context and relations.

Paper abstracts 

Paper abstracts must be maximum 300 words, excluding references. They should articulate: the research objectives or questions being addressed; the conceptual or theoretical perspectives informing the work; where appropriate, the methodology utilized; and the contribution of the paper to knowledge in light of the conference themes.

Optional full paper submission for consideration in best paper awards is due no later than 31st July 2019.

A maximum of two abstracts may be submitted per presenter (joint papers to be presented by co-authors will also be considered).

All paper abstracts must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.ukOn abstract submission please ensure you advise the conference stream.

Panel proposals
Panel proposals must be maximum 400 words, excluding references. They should include: the panel purpose and its relationship to the nominated conference stream; details of (minimum) three and (maximum) four papers and paper presenters to be included in the panel; and the expected contribution to the panel.
All panel proposals must be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Best Paper Competition 
Paper Submission:
To be eligible for the Best Paper awards you will need to submit a full paper by July 31st.  Papers should be submitted to isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

Article files should be provided in Microsoft Word format in font 12 with double spacing. Articles should be between 6500 and 9500 words in length with a maximum 300 word abstract. This includes all text including references and appendices. You should provide a title page with details of authors. References to other publications must be in Harvard style and carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency.
•          All tables and figures/diagrams should be included in the text
•          Selected full papers will be fast-tracked for publication in Special Editions of: the Journal of Social Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise Journal

​Indicative deadlines
Abstract and panel proposals submission: Closes 28th February 2019
Decision on submissions: Notification by 31st March 2019
Full papers submitted for consideration in best paper awards due: 31st July 2019 

Enquiries about conference administration and technical issues related to online submission should be directed to the conference administration team at isirc2019@gcu.ac.uk

More info at the original sources:

http://www.isircconference2019.com/call-for-papers.html

http://www.isircconference2019.com/uploads/1/2/0/0/120062879/alternative_economic_organising_for_social_innovation_ecologies_of_context_and_relations.pdf

[PhD Offers] Call for Proposals for Up to Three PhD Scholarships – Monetary Orders in Capitalist Modernity

The Hamburg Institute for Social Research is offering up to three scholarships for doctoral projects that seek to analyze empirical phenomena of monetary (dis-)orders with the aim of further developing debates on monetary theory. Proposals should focus on studying empirical phenomena that have not yet been considered by research or be dedicated to re-visiting previously explored issues and empirical evidence with new theoretical equipment. Of course, the ideas themselves can also become the subject of observation, provided that this is done with reference to monetary realities.

This call for proposals responds to developments in economic sociology, the history of capitalist cultures, political economy, and the anthropology of economic practices, in which modern economic forms are increasingly reflected upon as monetarized economies. All in all, these reflections are based on conceptual considerations on the question of what money actually is. For too long, perspectives on economic sociology, economic history, and political economics in particular have been marked by a neglect of theoretical considerations regarding money. Modern economies were commonly examined as market exchange economies, a theoretical framework that presupposes money as a functional condition, but is not specifically focused on modern economies as monetarized economies. Although empirically ubiquitous, in the research on processes of marketization and practices of market exchange, money itself has occupied a theoretically subordinate position. By placing empirical observations of money and its theoretical reflection at the center of capitalism research, however, it becomes possible to further develop alternatives to increasingly questionable, well-established conceptualizations of modern economies.

The scholarships will be awarded for innovative project ideas that deal with empirical cases to critically engage in these theoretical debates and seek to articulate independent positions. Proposals do not necessarily have to be premised on a preliminary decision as to whether money is to be addressed as a medium of exchange, as an “absolute” social means (of exchange), as credit—that is, a creditor-debtor relationship—, as a diverse collection of culturally shaped monetary practices, or in another, very different way. What is important is that the proposed research projects seek to make theoretical decisions on the basis of careful deliberation and scrupulous assessments that constitute significant and competitive contributions in the context of current debates. Under no circumstances should the following list of possible topics therefore be considered complete:

  • How and why do alternative means of payment (such as local or crypto currencies) arise and how do multiple currencies and monetary orders coexist, what interactions or interferences arise between them, and what social effects do these contacts have?
  • What role do monetary orders play in macroscopic developments of global inequalities?
  • Are changes or structural continuities of monetary orders related to other socio-economic transformation processes such as digitalization?
  • How has the functional, economic, or social significance of cash changed; how can we assess the current debate on the opportunities and risks of abolishing cash from a sociological and political-economic perspective? What is the relevance of cash as a field of business and as a growing global market for research on and theories of money?
  • What significance do monetary hierarchies between currencies and between forms of money have for global power relations; how do these relations change as a result of transformations in the global economy and the economic rise of states and regions?
  • What significance do monetary hierarchies and the shift of the privilege of money creation to private banks have for the economic dynamics and stability of financialized capitalism?
  • What role do nation-states play for the creation and maintenance of monetary orders—in theory and in practice? How “monetarily sovereign” are modern states, that is, do they have the capacity to finance every expenditure, independent of their revenue?
  • To what extent can reflection on the nature of money contribute to our understanding of the construction, development, and crisis of Europe’s supranational currency?
  • Do financial and economic crises have dimensions relevant to a theory of money?
  • What role does the value or purchasing power of money play for different theories, and what explanatory approaches do we have and need in order to record changes in monetary values and relations? Is there a need for a new, non-economic theory of inflation and if so, what would it be like?
  • Do we need a theory-sensitive analysis of the history of ideas of money and monetary orders, because the existing ones are shaped by certain theories of money that may be questionable from today’s perspective?
  • Which social conflicts that are linked to the design of monetary orders can be identified from a contemporary and historical perspective? To what extent is making such distinctions useful for furthering the analysis of economic change; that is, how sensitive must the history of capitalism be with regard to the significance of money?

The Hamburg Institute for Social Research has a tradition of focusing on the phenomenon of violence. Research projects that can bridge the gap between theoretical debates on violence and analyses of monetary (dis)orders are thus especially welcome.

The scholarships carry a monthly stipend of 1400 Euro. This is a base amount. Scholarship recipients will receive supplements for one or more children and may be eligible for further supplements. Detailed information can be found here. The scholarships will be awarded for two years with an option for an extension of up to two further years.

Scholarship-financed research projects at the Hamburg Institute for Social Research come with an additional budget for travel, books, and other research-related expenses that are appropriate to the requirements of the respective project. A workplace will be provided, and regular presence at the Institute is expected for the duration of the scholarship.

Applicants must have an above-average degree in sociology, history, cultural studies, political science, economics, or a related discipline.

Applications with cover letter, curriculum vitae, an academic work sample (master thesis, term paper), certificates and transcripts showing grades for all courses completed, and an outline of the proposed doctoral project or a collection of sketches of ideas (five pages maximum) must be submitted in a single PDF document by e-mail to monetary-orders(at)his-online.de. The closing date for applications is 18 November 2018. The earliest date for funding is 1 March 2019.

If you have any questions regarding the content of this call, please do not hesitate to contact us at the e-mail address provided.

Source: https://www.his-online.de/en/the-institute/working-at-his/vacant-positions/phdscholarships/